Personal Brands, Agency Management and Scale

By | September 13, 2012
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Earlier this week, Paul Roetzer (@paulroetzer) and Mitch Joel (@mitchjoel) discussed personal brands and their relationship to agency business goals on the Six Pixels of Separation podcast. The conversation asks the questions:

  • CrowdAre personal brands scalable? How big is too big?
  • How do you distinguish between your personal and agency brands?
  • How do you ensure that your business doesn’t fall by the wayside while building your personal brand?
  • Can agency leaders burn themselves out trying to achieve both?

Listen to the full conversation here.

Values vs. Goals

My favorite takeaway from the conversation was Mitch’s differentiation between values and goals. Essentially, values are aspirations that do not have an expiration date and can’t be completely achieved. Values define who you are as an individual and company. Mitch’s example: “I always want to be coming up with new or original ideas.”

Based on these values, business leaders should then set goals for themselves. What can you do right now to achieve the values you set for yourself? If going on a speaking tour, writing a book or other activities typically associated with building a personal brand fit into that overall value proposition, great. If not, that’s okay too.

Activities that are totally in flow with your values are much more enjoyable to complete—no matter how demanding they may become. 

Established Agency Roles

Mitch also explained that effective agency management requires roles and responsibilities within the agency to fit within this value system.

It’s always important to remember that even those with the largest personal brands are still part of an overall team, committed to the agency’s success. For example, all of Mitch’s speaking and book revenue goes back into the agency, not his own personal pocketbook.

Are Personal Brands of Agency Leaders Scalable?

How do you manage your personal and agency brands? Share your experiences and thoughts in the comments section below.

​Image Source: James Cridland